North American cold and allergy medicine industry is estimated to be a $3 billion money-maker for the drug companies. Any attempt to restrict the sale of their products is going to generate a lot of resistance.

That’s exactly what is currently experiencing Senator Michael Sanders who chairs the Subcommittee on Drug Policy (part of the ambitious Government Reform Committee). His gray hair would make you think that this tall, slim, man is much older than fifty. Contribute that to years of hard work making the pharmaceutical industry accountable. Back in 2005, Sanders was instrumental in bringing forward tough new legislation that limited the amount of cold and allergy medications to be sold to an individual. Temporarily, it slowed the abuse, but recently available data confirms that meth use is on a rise again. Read more

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FEATURED ARTICLE
Meth Apocalypse
An indepth look into the reasons behind the recent
spike in methamphetamine abuse in Canada and US
by Anna Foster
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A D V E R T I S E M E N T

                                         Speed, crank, crystal - by any name, crystal meth is today the most talked about drug on the continent. But there is an untold story about meth, a story of a fierce battle over the key ingredient to the drug, which is also the key ingredient in many very profitable cold and allergy medicines - pseudoephedrine.